Category Archives: Business World

Shared Post: The Progress Principle…

What do you think motivates employees? When I ask this question to my clients, typical responses include incentives, bonuses, promotions or awards. In fact, there is an entire consulting category dedicated to helping companies maximize employee retention, engagement and productivity through compensation and rewards strategies. If you are interested in doing just one simple thing […]

via The Progress Principle – Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work — DRH Group

Word of the Day + Repost: The top 10 words of TED2015

Great top 10 list here from TED Blog. But the word that caught my eye is “retronym,” used in number 9. If you click the link it takes you to wordnik.com which defines the word this way:

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition
  • n. A word or phrase created because an existing term that was once used alone needs to be distinguished from a term referring to a new development, as acoustic guitar in contrast to electric guitar or analog watch in contrast to digital watch.
from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License
  • n. A new word or phrase coined for an old object or concept whose original name has become used for something else or is no longer unique (such as acoustic guitar where guitar used to mean this but can now also refer to an electric guitar).
from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.
  • n. a word introduced because an existing term has become inadequate

Read user feedback on this word over at wordnik.com and see how TED Blog uses it in the post below. While you’re at it store these 10 words in the back of your brain. You’re sure to see and hear them again in the coming months.

TED Blog

Erin McKean shares the top 10 words of TED2015. Her #6: placemaking, from Theaster Gates' TED Talk. Photo: Bret Hartman/TED Erin McKean shares the top 10 words of TED2015. Her #6: placemaking, from Theaster Gates’ TED Talk. Photo: Bret Hartman/TED

TED is about ideas worth spreading, and these often come wrapped up in words worth knowing. Here are some of the great words from TED2015:

10. Neurodiversity. From Steve Silberman’s talk on the history of the autism spectrum. It’s a word that began popping up in 1998, and it means “the variety of configurations of the brain, especially with regard to autism.” A word all neurotypical people should know.

9. Kinetic attack. From David Rothkopf’s talk on the global threat of cyberattacks. Kinetic attacks involve moving parts — think bullets and bombs. This phrase is an example of a retronym.

8. Court-scraper. Heard at a lunch to celebrate the publication of The Future of Architecture in 100 Buildings by Marc Kushner. The context: “But not, of course…

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Entrepreneurship Thrives in the #Hive

Busy lawyers and entrepreneurs Bradley Lum and Trey Waterloo understand the desire for independence and the roadblocks that keep most people from it. They’ve  navigated the hurdles inherent to stepping out on your own and now want to help fellow entrepreneurs solve some common problems, such as the need for an independent work environment conducive to effective and efficient work habits, the need for targeted education that would aid in reaching certain goals, and the need for affordable health-care options for the self-employed. Continue reading Entrepreneurship Thrives in the #Hive

IBD’s 10 Secrets to Success: Not just for Investors

The following list comes from Investor’s Business Daily. I’m not sure if IBD still does this, but each day they would publish an article highlighting and expounding upon one of the “secrets.”  The great thing about IBD’s list of success traits it that it’s not just for investors, anyone can implement it hence the reason for sharing it here. The key to benefiting from it? Don’t just read it. You have to incorporate it into your daily habits. So dig in and watch your dreams flourish! Continue reading IBD’s 10 Secrets to Success: Not just for Investors

Written in the Flowers

It’s funny when you think you know your calling in life, then an unexpected turn of events reveals your true purpose. For Ayana Taylor Kinnel it was an internship and a rally that changed everything. Kinnel, 32, grew up knowing without a doubt that she wanted to be a writer. She got a bachelor’s degree in English from Tougaloo College and went into print journalism. Then in 2005 while interning for the Jackson Free Press, she helped plan and coordinate a political rally. “When we did the rally I knew what my true calling was,” she says. Kinnel got caught up in Continue reading Written in the Flowers