Category Archives: The Pantry

Recipes, food and drink information and recommendations.

‘Tis the Season to Be Tipsy and Merry

The time between now and the end of the year has historically been filled with lots of celebrating. And drinking. So I wanted to share some festive drinks in honor of the season. Now, around this time of year I always go browsing for yummy drink recipes that I want to try. Somehow, I never get to the part where I actually make any of them. However, this time I’m determined to make something between now and the new year. I just haven’t decided what yet. Problem is, Continue reading ‘Tis the Season to Be Tipsy and Merry

Spices for Christmas — Cooking without Limits

Cinnamon, ginger, turmeric and cardamom are just a few spices that instantly conjure up Christmas. I am using them in mulled wine, cakes, cookies, hot chocolate and coffee. I know turmeric and cardamom are not really spices for Christmas, but I think they deserve to be on my spices list for Christmas. Cinnamon is obtained […]

via Spices for Christmas — Cooking without Limits

From Huff Post: 13 Creative Ways You Could Be Using Mason Jars | Rachel Hollis

Mason jars are absolutely adorable and totally useful! Since I’m quite obsessed, I find ways to incorporate them on The Chic Site and in my home as much as possible. I’m sure, like me, you end up accumulating a variety of jars in your house throughout the week. Instead of recycling them, or worse tossing them out, try one of these creative ways to put them to good use. Continue reading From Huff Post: 13 Creative Ways You Could Be Using Mason Jars | Rachel Hollis

Dr. Davis’ All-Purpose Baking Mix | The Dr. Oz Show

Author Dr. William Davis’ mix is not only healthy but also great for those that are gluten-free. Use this baking mix to make some of Dr. Davis’ favorite recipes like peanut butter cookies, pepperoni bread, herbed foccacia, cinnamon-pecan scones, triple berry muffins, and grain-free pizza.

Ingredients

  • 4 cup almond meal (or almond flour)
  • 1 cup ground golden flaxseeds
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp ground psyllium seeds (optional)

Email this shopping list to yourself from the original post Dr. Davis’ All-Purpose Baking Mix | The Dr. Oz Show.

Directions

1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl.

2. Keep in an air-tight container in the refridgerator and use as needed.

Dr. Davis' gluten-free Herbed Focaccia.
Dr. Davis’ gluten-free Herbed Focaccia.

This Cake Will Have You Humming Holiday Melodies!

Every Christmas for about the last 8 years  I say I’m going to make a Hummingbird Cake. But I never do. I always end up buying some other cake. A Hummingbird Cake is a scrumptious spice cake made with bananas and pineapples, typically with pecans and sometimes coconut.

This year, to hold myself to making one, I called up my mother-n-law who lives in another state 14 hours away.  I asked for her oh so delicious Hummingbird cake recipe, and that simple act alone pretty much binds me to turning one out this year.  I can’t disappoint her with “oh well, I decided not to make it.” She’s always so excited whenever I call to ask for a recipe that I refuse to let her down. I HAVE to tell her how wonderful it turned out, right? So it’d better, or else I’m sure hubby might accidentally let it slip to her that either I didn’t make it or it turned out atrociously.

Even so, naturally, I want to add something different to make it my own. Sort of.  So I went online to get a few ideas. I came across two that I like: 1. Paula Dean’s version looks super yummy.  Plus the video of Paula and son Jaime whipping up this southern layered favorite is quite comical.  I just had to share it. 2.  I found a version that is pretty close to my mother-n-law’s.

I still haven’t decided what twist I’m going to add if any to my first Hummingbird Cake ever, but I’m posting what I found below courtesy of foodnetwork.com.

Do you have a better Hummingbird Cake recipe? Post it on our facebook page or tag @etudelife on Pinterest or Twitter.

Paula Dean’s Version

Although in the video they don’t quite stick to the written recipe, I’ve posted it below.


paula dean hummingbird vid link

Ingredients
Nonstick baking spray
2 sticks (1 cup) butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
4 large eggs
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup buttermilk
1 1/2 cups mashed ripe banana (about 4 medium)
One 8-ounce can crushed pineapple
Frosting, recipe follows
Optional garnishes: sweetened flaked coconut, chopped macadamia nuts
Frosting:
2 sticks (1 cup) butter, softened
Two 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened
2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Directions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray three 9-inch baking pans with nonstick baking spray.

In a large bowl, beat the butter, granulated sugar and vanilla at medium speed with a mixer until fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Add to the butter mixture alternately with the buttermilk, beginning and ending with the flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Add the bananas and pineapple, beating until combined.

Using a measuring cup, spoon the batter into each of the three prepared pans, one scoop at a time to ensure an even distribution. Slam the pans against the counter to get any air bubbles out of the batter.

Bake until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean, 25 to 35 minutes. Cool in the pans for 10 minutes. Remove from the pans and cool completely on wire racks.

Spread some Frosting between the layers. Spread the remaining frosting over the top and sides of the cake. Garnish with coconut and nuts if desired.

Frosting:
Beat the butter and cream cheese together with a handheld electric mixer until smooth and creamy. Beat in the confectioners’ sugar in increments. Lastly beat in the lemon juice and vanilla.

Recipe courtesy Paula Deen

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/hummingbird-cake-recipe.html?oc=linkback

Food Network’s Version

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Ingredients
  • Unsalted butter, for greasing
  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 cup pecan pieces
  • 3 ripe bananas, chopped
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh pineapple
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • For the Frosting:
  • 2 packages cream cheese (8 ounces each), at room temperature
  • 12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature
  • 2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Directions

Make the cake: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter two 8-inch round cake pans and line with parchment paper. Butter the parchment and dust with flour.

Spread the pecans on a baking sheet and bake until fragrant and toasted, about 8 minutes. Let cool slightly, then roughly chop. Toss with the bananas, pineapple and 1/2 cup flour in a small bowl.

Whisk the remaining 2 1/4 cups flour, the cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, baking soda and salt in a bowl. Beat the eggs and granulated sugar in a separate bowl with a mixer on high speed until thick and light, 5 minutes. Gradually beat in the vegetable oil.

Sprinkle the flour mixture over the egg mixture, then gently fold to make a thick batter. Fold in the pecan-fruit mixture, then transfer the batter to the prepared pans. Bake until the cakes are firm and a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean, 50 to 55 minutes. Cool in the pans on a rack, 25 minutes, then invert the cakes onto the rack to cool completely.

Make the frosting: Beat the cream cheese in a large bowl with a mixer until fluffy, then gradually beat in the butter until combined. Sift the confectioners’ sugar over the cream cheese mixture and beat until smooth. Add the lemon zest and vanilla and beat until light and fluffy.

Place one cake layer on a serving plate. Spread about half of the frosting on top, then cover with the other cake layer. Spread the remaining frosting over the top and sides of the cake.

Photograh by Stephanie Foley

Wine Drinking Tips | A Toast to Our 2nd Favorite Adult Beverage

I’d been planning to write about wines for some time now so I can appreciate these tips from pslovecharli.com.

PSLOVECHARLI.COM | The Official PSLOVECHARLI Site

Slide over, sweaty mug of brutish beer; wine has stepped up its game!

In the past two decades, zins, cabs and chardonnays have soared in popularity among imbibing Americans. The preference of just one in four in 1992, its now the alcoholic beverage of choice for 35 percent of us, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. At the same time, beer has taken a tumble, from the favorite of nearly half of us to just 36 percent.

“Wine is an adventure in a glass – something other cultures have recognized for centuries,” says Howard Kleinfeld, author (as Howard K.) of “Dial M for Merlot,” www.DialMforMerlot.com, a fun novel about a lovelorn nerd whose world snaps to life with his first wine tasting.

merlot3 Please contact us to have this photo properly credited or removed.

“For a long time in this country, we viewed wine as an elitist beverage. Just to…

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Urban Foraging in Jackson

Shout-out to Jesse L. Yancy for sharing some of the hidden bounty that Jackson Mississippi has to offer.

Made in Mississippi

When the ground begins to warm around the end of March, I begin looking, on my frequent walks around the decaying buildings in the heart of Jackson, for the first shoots of poke salad, which Euell Gibbons lauds as “probably the best-known and most widely-used wild vegetable in America.”

A month later, Jake and I drive to the abandoned lots off West Fortification and pick the blackberries we find there growing in abundance. Near that same spot, in early June, I harvest the sweet little red plums from thorny, stunted trees along the railroad tracks near Pleasant Avenue and black cherries from a tree on Greymont down near the fairgrounds. In the early summer, I gather pears and figs from around abandoned houses in Belhaven Heights down off High Street. And in October through November, all over the city, pecan trees drop tons of nuts, though some years are good…

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