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ASCAP Artists on Why They Create Music

The film short Why We Create Music, commemorating ASCAP’s 100 year anniversary, is just as inspiring as, if not more so than, the resulting song and companion video

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Everyone wants to be the one messaging app that rules them all — but there’s no such thing, and never will be

Gigaom

If you were engaged in something worthwhile on Thursday rather than paying attention to technology blogs, you might have missed the fact that photo-sharing app Instagram — now a subsidiary of social behemoth Facebook Inc. (s fb) — launched a new feature the company calls Instagram Direct, as Om predicted it would several weeks ago. The new feature essentially turns Instagram into a messaging app, allowing users to send the equivalent of direct messages to friends along with a picture or video.

This feature obviously pits Instagram against a horde of other messaging apps and micro-social networks, including Twitter (s twtr) — which just launched a new photo-enhanced direct-messaging feature of its own — as well as Snapchat, Kik, WhatsApp, and Facebook’s own branded messenger service. It’s getting so smartphone users could probably fill up an entire screen with just apps that involve photo-sharing and/or messaging of some kind.

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Artist Creates 3D Art Using Strangers’ DNA

NewsFeed

You may want to think twice the next time you spit out your gum in the street, because New York artist Healther Dewey-Hagborg might pick it up and turn it into a sculpture that looks like you.

Dewey-Hagborg collects hairs from public restrooms, fingernails, cigarette butts and wads of discarded chewing gum from sidewalks and subway cars. Then, the Brooklyn-based artist extracts the DNA and turns it into 3D sculptures that look like the face of the person who left the DNA traces behind.

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