Category Archives: Arts & Entertainment

Talents that Show Up Later — La Alza Health and Wellness

So, if you’re thinking you’re getting a ‘late start’ or that time has passed you by…consider this: Anna Mary Robertson Moses, aka: “Grandma” Moses (1860-1961) started painting in her seventies. For the majority of her life, she and her husband raised a family of 10 children, five of whom would survive infancy. It was during […]

via Talents that Show Up Later — La Alza Health and Wellness

Let Pixar teach you how to tell stories! It’s Free!!

Pixar Animation Studios has launched the first of six free online lessons covering the art of storytelling, led by Pete Docter, Mark Andrews, and other filmmakers from the renowned Disney-owned studio.

The new series is available for free through online-education platform… Continue reading Let Pixar teach you how to tell stories! It’s Free!!

Magic

This week, make some magic.

Children have the ability to believe without bias, to find wonder even in the most mundane of places and objects. As adults, we become dulled to the magic inherent to life, and perhaps we stop seeking it altogether. However, as photographers, we have an opportunity to reclaim it. Magic and beauty can be conjured in the simplest of photographs, which may then inspire wonder in the viewer. Continue reading Magic — The Daily Post by Jen H.

7 Super Effective Ways To Ramp Up The Tension In Your Screenplay

Gideon's Screenwriting Tips: Now You're a Screenwriter

Dramatic conflict is the backbone of quality screenplays. What better ways to raise the conflict in your screenwriting than modulating the tension in your story?

Tension in your writing can be defined as a period of elevated emotional intensity.

Here are some ways to effectively utilize tension in your story:

1) BURSTS OF TENSION

Tension can be either short lived or sustained. In order for tension to be effective in your script, it must be ACTIVATED, SUSTAINED and RELEASED. Prolonged tension will only tire and disengage your audience.

2)  MACRO INTENSITY

The levels of tension must be manipulated to hook your audience. Firstly consider the overall level of danger in the story arc.

In the macro story, the tension needs to be escalated in a “SAW TOOTH” format. This is basically the attack-sustain-release model. Think about the set pieces in your story and how they correlate with periods of  tension. My preference is for…

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There’s No Such Thing as ‘Too Old’ or ‘Too Young’ to Be Creative

Read Julia Cameron‘s entire article on Motto 

Ours is a youth-oriented culture. A glance at the tabloids tells us of the exploits of the young. There is not as much of a platform for the artistic achievements and accomplishments of the older or even the middle aged. We falsely believe that creativity belongs to the young, and so, when we pass a certain age, we tell ourselves we are “over the hill.” We ignore the fact that many artists create well into what might be called their “dotage.”

The idea that creativity fades with age is false.

Twenty-five years ago, I wrote a book on creativity called The Artist’s Way. Over four million people have worked with that book. I have taught many live classes and have often found my just-retired students to be the most poignant. Setting out to write a book on creativity and aging, It’s Never Too Late to Begin Again, I discovered that many of us have a fiery passion we long to express in our golden years. As we turn our hand to the page, crafting a memoir of our time on the planet, many dreams surge to the fore. It is not “too late” to begin their pursuit. Often, our life’s experience gives us a “leg up” in creating meaningful art. Comfortable in our own skin, we may find the gift of candor as a passion that has been brewing for decades pushes to the fore with energy and conviction.

We are taught to believe that negative equals realistic and positive equals unrealistic. Nonsense.

Internalizing these destructive messages, we believe we’re “too old,” decide it’s “too late.” But “I’m too old” is something we tell ourselves to save ourselves from the emotional cost of the ego deflation involved in being a beginner.

In the moment of creation, we are ageless. We feel both young at heart and old and wise. “Artists work until the end,” my photographer friend Daniel said to me recently. Yes, they do. This is why retirement from one career— even if it is our major career—is not, by any means, “the end.” Because the act of creating something, anything, renders us timeless, because the act of creation is led by that inner, youthful part of ourselves, we continually reinvent our lives through our art. The capacity to create is as innate as our very life force. I would even say that our creativity and our life force might be one and the same.

Julia Cameron is the author of more than 30 books, including The Artist’s Way, Walking in This World, Finding Water and, most recently, It’s Never Too Late to Begin Again.

Writer Director Tina Gordon Chism on the Creative Process

At a time when it’s so easy and convenient to whip out a smart device to jot down an idea or take notes, it’s refreshing to see that the good ol’ notebook hasn’t gone completely out of style.  In this Creative Spark segment, writer and director Tina Gordon Chism (Drumline, ATL, Peeples) talks about her passion for the “slow burn” of Continue reading Writer Director Tina Gordon Chism on the Creative Process

The Creativity 50: 10th Anniversary Edition

Creativity (formerly a print magazine, now a website) rolled out the first “Creativity 50” list during their 20th Anniversary in 2006. Ten years in, the dynamics of the list seem to have shifted. In the beginning the majority of those who made the list were from the advertising and design world. This year, however, only 16% of the list falls into the advertising category while 42% of the list is comprised of creatives from the entertainment world. Continue reading The Creativity 50: 10th Anniversary Edition

Creative Process by Animator Simon Otto (How to Train Your Dragon 2)

“Creativity is like a dark room. You go in and you start shining light on things and build out from that… (genius) that’s not who I am. (But) I’m capable of letting it evolve and keep adding on to it; keep making it better. To me, creativity is about searching for something. And when you know it’s good, you need to not let it go. “Simon Otto Continue reading Creative Process by Animator Simon Otto (How to Train Your Dragon 2)

JSU Exhibit highlights social issues and tourism in Brazil

During the 2015 summer term, nine art majors in Jackson State University’s College of Liberal Arts had the opportunity to visit Salvador Da Bahia, Brazil, as part of the JSU Passport to the World study abroad program.

“It’s actually one of the only places that I wanted to go (to), so when they brought up the opportunity I just took it.” senior Chris Skipper says. Daria Davis, also a senior adds “It was surreal. It was nothing that I expected it to be.” Continue reading JSU Exhibit highlights social issues and tourism in Brazil