‘Tis the Season to Be Tipsy and Merry

The time between now and the end of the year has historically been filled with lots of celebrating. And drinking. So I wanted to share some festive drinks in honor of the season. Now, around this time of year I always go browsing for yummy drink recipes that I want to try. Somehow, I never get to the part where I actually make any of them. However, this time I’m determined to make something between now and the new year. I just haven’t decided what yet. Problem is, Continue reading ‘Tis the Season to Be Tipsy and Merry

Spices for Christmas — Cooking without Limits

Cinnamon, ginger, turmeric and cardamom are just a few spices that instantly conjure up Christmas. I am using them in mulled wine, cakes, cookies, hot chocolate and coffee. I know turmeric and cardamom are not really spices for Christmas, but I think they deserve to be on my spices list for Christmas. Cinnamon is obtained […]

via Spices for Christmas — Cooking without Limits

Magic

This week, make some magic.

Children have the ability to believe without bias, to find wonder even in the most mundane of places and objects. As adults, we become dulled to the magic inherent to life, and perhaps we stop seeking it altogether. However, as photographers, we have an opportunity to reclaim it. Magic and beauty can be conjured in the simplest of photographs, which may then inspire wonder in the viewer. Continue reading Magic — The Daily Post by Jen H.

Why Black Speculative Fiction Month Matters

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October is Black Speculative Fiction Month and like legions of others, I am celebrating it something fierce.

Why does Black Speculative Fiction Month matter?

Black Speculative Fiction Month matters because now more than ever our stories must be told and our voices must be heard. Black Speculative Fiction Month matters because too often at cons and writing events, I’m the only nonwhite guest in attendance.

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Sheryl Underwood Inspires Audience at MS Greek Weekend Step & Comedy Show

It was a night of line strolling and rolling in the aisles. The 2016 Mississippi Greek Weekend Step and Comedy Show, hosted by comedian and Zeta Phi Beta soror, Sheryl Underwood, was lit.  Continue reading Sheryl Underwood Inspires Audience at MS Greek Weekend Step & Comedy Show

Fantasia shares a glimpse of the process behind making “The Definition of…”

Fantasia Barrino is, unapologetically, an open book. The reason she shares so much of herself is because she believes someone somewhere will benefit from her experiences.   Continue reading Fantasia shares a glimpse of the process behind making “The Definition of…”

Power’s Lela Loren explains how they captured Tommy’s drug rage

If you don’t know by now, Lela Loren plays Angela Valdes, Ghost’s mistress on the oh so hot Starz drama, Power, now in it’s third season. In a nutshell, Ghost (Omari Hardwick) is a complicated, three-headed monster of a character. So naturally, Continue reading Power’s Lela Loren explains how they captured Tommy’s drug rage

Salvaging your child’s creativity — the new literacy

We know them — the kids who read before they are potty trained, play classical piano before entering elementary school, or compute high school math in first grade. While the world shudders, in reality, most child prodigies rarely become influential change agents.

Why not? According to Adam Grant, in his New York Times article, How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off, what holds them back is that they don’t learn to be original. They strive to earn the approval of their parents and the admiration of their teachers. But in their perfection, they don’t get the chance to innovate. In adulthood, these prodigies may become experts in their fields — but only a fraction of these gifted children become revolutionary adult creators.

Grant explains how the gifted may learn to play Mozart, but rarely compose their own original scores. They conform to codified rules, rather than inventing their own. Ironically, research shows that those who are bound for creativity are less likely to be embraced by their teacher — they have their own ideas.

In comparison, the most creative artists didn’t have elite teachers — their first lessons came from nearby instructors who made learning fun. Mozart showed interest in music before he took lessons, not the other way around.

Read Laurie Futterman’s entire article to find out what’s killing creativity.

About the featured image: Just like Mozart, Mary Lou Williams started playing the piano at the impressionable age of four. She became a professional musician at the age of eight.  Learn more about Williams in The Little Piano Girl: The Story of Mary Lou Williams, Jazz Legend available at Amazon. 

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